This is what the oath of Canadian citizenship looks like after the Queen’s death

Each year, thousands of immigrants across the country eagerly await the privilege of reading the oath of Canadian citizenship.

Since the death of Canada’s head of state, Queen Elizabeth II, many aspiring Canadian citizens have wondered how the loss will be reflected in the oath of Canadian citizenship, since the text includes a line about bearing true allegiance to the queen.

Here’s what it looked like during the Queen’s lifetime:

“I swear (or solemnly affirm) that I will be faithful and bear true allegiance to Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth, Second Queen of Canada, to her heirs and successors, that I will faithfully observe the laws of Canada, including the Constitution which recognizes and affirms the Aboriginal and Treaty rights of First Nations, Inuit and Métis, and that I will faithfully perform my duties as a Canadian citizen.

The text was updated last year to include and recognize Indigenous rights. It was again amended and all mentions of the Queen were replaced with King Charles III.

“Following the death of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II yesterday, the reference to Her Majesty in the oath of citizenship has been changed to refer to King Charles III,” IRCC representative Stuart Isherwood told Daily Hive in an email.

According to this information, the new oath will read as follows:

“I swear (or solemnly affirm) that I will be faithful and bear true allegiance to His Majesty King Charles, Third King of Canada, to his heirs and successors, that I will faithfully observe the laws of Canada, including the Constitution which recognizes and affirms the Aboriginal and Treaty rights of First Nations, Inuit and Métis, and that I will faithfully perform my duties as a Canadian citizen.

“This change was made pursuant to the Interpretation Act and applies to all future citizenship ceremonies,” Isherwood added.

“The Citizenship Act and written references to the Oath of Citizenship will be formally amended in due course. »